Scooters And One Wheels

E-scooter riders in NI will not profit from Westminster transfer to legalize them on public roads

Northern Ireland e-scooter riders won’t benefit from a proposed change in GB regulations that could see them legalized on the road.

It is currently illegal to ride electric scooters on public roads or in public spaces across Northern Ireland.

The Department for Infrastructure oversees e-scooter regulations here and says its “officials are currently monitoring developments” in GB to advise the Minister on a way forward.

Read more: NI active travel “hasn’t been given the backing required” admits Minister

In the meantime, though, the PSNI is tasked with enforcing current law which makes them ‘illegal’.

A Department for Infrastructure spokesperson told Belfast Live: “It is currently illegal to use electric scooters on public roads and public spaces in the North.

“The impact of e-scooters on the safety of pedestrians and other road users has raised concerns across Europe.

“Here, enforcement is the responsibility of the PSNI, who have advised that they are taking steps to increase their response given the current increase in the illegal usage of e-scooters.

“Any decision on the potential use of e-scooters here is a matter for the Minister for Infrastructure.

read more
read more

“The Department for Transport have recently announced an intention to create regulations that will legalize e-scooters in England. The regulations will take account of any recommendations from the current pilot schemes in England which are due to complete in November 2022.

“The proposed change in regulations in England does not apply to Northern Ireland, however, DfI officials are currently monitoring developments there and following review will provide advice to the Minister on the way forward.”

Police said the vehicles are “not defined within law” or approved for road use despite being able to buy one at any age.

Under current law, riders need a driving license, while e-scooters must be taxed, insured, fitted with lights and a number plate.

Those using e-scooters illegally on public roads or in public places face warnings, fine, seizure and a possible conviction if they are pulled over by the police.

Read more: Walking buses at three Belfast schools ‘a roaring success’

Read more: Residents call for action after years of parking misery caused by commuters

To get the latest breaking news straight to your inbox, sign up to our free newsletter.

Related Articles